AMD Ryzen 9 3990X 64-Core CPU For Just ₹3.5 Lakhs

You don’t normally write ‘just’ and ‘₹3.5 Lakhs’ in the same sentence, but with a CPU this good, compared to Intel, AMD is practically giving them away.

AMD announced this beast of a CPU at CES 2020, the 3990X with the price tag of just $4,000 (₹2.8 lakh technically, but this is a converted value). Most of the time, especially in the CPU market, this type of pricing is a contradiction in terms, considering that this is a 64-core CPU

Saying that this undercuts Intel is quite literally an understatement. Even the high-end Intel HEDT(High End Desktop) CPU, i9-10980XE, is $1000 and has a mere 18 cores. Even the server based Xeon Platinum 8280 with 28-cores and 56-threads, with the MSRP of $10,000 (₹7.1 lakh, this is a converted price).

Source: Guru3D

The 3990X sports a 2.9GHz base clock, a 4.3GHz boost clock, a 256MB L3 cache and a impressive 2.9GHz to 3.1GHz all-core (considering that this has a 280W TDP).

3990x’s performance of 24K is nearly 1.45x higher than the 3970x, but Cinebench has typically stronger scaling than this. Then again, this is the first time the application has tested these many cores. It can also be possible the poor scaling is due to the application not addressing this many cores properly.

Now the downside to this CPU might be the four RAM channels to feed the insane 64-cores. AMD recommend at least 64GB of RAM for this chip but 256GB might be more appropriate, depending on the workload.

Now is this CPU worth investing in? As with the other Ryzen processors, today’s software and operating systems still are not designed to fully utilize massively parallel x86 architectures, but with time and effort AMD has pushed the industry to fully utilize it’s silicon. The Threadripper 3990X, due to loads of software limitations is a very specialized workhorse, mostly for the most demanding customers in a narrow field of visual effects and rendering world.

All in all the AMD Ryzen 9 3990X represents the best value to performance in what is arguably a very new market segment, with software slowly evolving to take advantage of the chip’s resources.

Robin Sunny

Robin is a AMD fanboy and a techie who studies programming for a living, in that order.

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